Posts made in July, 2011

Special An interview with novelist Henriette Aboudi about her latest novel "Farewell Mardin", written in Arabic. / Azad-Hye

Posted by on Jul 14, 2011 in Articles, Library | Comments Off on Special An interview with novelist Henriette Aboudi about her latest novel "Farewell Mardin", written in Arabic. / Azad-Hye

The novel is about Seyfo (the Genocide of Syriac, Assyrian and Chaldean population in the Ottoman Empire during WWI), which coincided with the Armenian Genocide. Due to the importance of the subject to the Armenians we addressed author Henriette Aboudi and asked her about her book. The Swedish parliament has already recognized the Armenian genocide and mentioned the Assyrian genocide in the known pronouncement. The publishing of your novel coincides with a time when there’s a growing interest in the fate of the nations that were part of the Ottoman Empire before the Genocide of 1915-1918....

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The Sisters of Sinai: How Two Lady Adventurers Discovered the Hidden Gospels, / by Janet Soskice

Posted by on Jul 13, 2011 in Articles, Library | Comments Off on The Sisters of Sinai: How Two Lady Adventurers Discovered the Hidden Gospels, / by Janet Soskice

Janet Soskice’s The Sisters of Sinai is a pioneering biography of two women, identical Scottish twins born in 1843, who without the opportunity for university study fashioned themselves into biblical scholars whose achievements were nothing less than spectacular. The subtitle, How Two Lady Adventurers Discovered the Hidden Gospels sounds sensational, but this history truly is sensational. Agnes Smith Lewis and her sister Margaret Dunlop Gibson [End Page 341] undertook dangerous journeys to St. Catherine’s monastery in Sinai where they discovered what turned out to be the second...

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Hunayn Ibn Ishaq: A Forgotten Legend / Samir Johna

Posted by on Jul 13, 2011 in Articles, Library | Comments Off on Hunayn Ibn Ishaq: A Forgotten Legend / Samir Johna

IT DOES NOT MATTER whether we like the history of science or not. If we were to understand the continuity of medical science progress we must study the science of the ancient times, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance because they are not exclusive but rather overlapping. The Greek miracle of marvelous arts, science, and culture over two centuries before the Christian era came very close to perishing if it were not for its transmission through the dark ages. Perhaps it is best stated by Sarton( n1). “Transmission is as important as discovery.” If all of the ancient science had...

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